(00 33) 2 98 39 62 25
Contact Fax (by appointment) :
(00 33) 9 50 04 32 70
Headquarters : 5 Hent Meneyer, 29 950 Gouesnac'h, France.
Postal address : 2 impasse de Kervégant, 29 350 Moëlan sur mer, France.
If there is an archipelago in Brittany that can come close to its southern sea counterparts, it is the Glénan Archipelago, a scattering of nine large islands and numerous smaller siblings in the sea off Concarneau, its snow white sands lapped by clear turquoise waters. The Glénan Archipelago is composed of nine principal islands and a large number of smaller isles, but it is thought that way back this mass of granite had been a single land mass; indeed local legend even talks of how the nine Glénan isles were once one big island. They were eroded gradually by the waves over time but, if popular hearsay is anything to go by, collective memory of the time when this archipelago was part of the continent is not yet completely lost. It is said that it used to be possible to walk from Beg Meil (on the mainland) to the Ile aux Moutons, which is now far out at sea, and also that the Trévignon headland used to adjoin Cigogne island.

03/11/2018 - Learn more...
Classed as a ‘Biosphere Reserve’ by UNESCO, and part of the Armorique Regional Park, the island of Ouessant and the Molène Archipelago offer a striking vision of untamed beauty, and their powerful lighthouses watch over one of the busiest seafaring routes in the world, the Rail d’Ouessant. Molène has been inhabited since prehistoric times, and Ouessant is redolent of Ireland. These are among the Ponant Isles, alongside Groix and Belle-Ile in Morbihan, the Glénan Archipelago in southern Finistère, and many others, because this grouping brings together fifteen islands, all of which are have permanent inhabitants. Starting from the English Channel (from north to south) they are: Chausey Archipelago, Ile de Bréhat, Ile de Batz, Ile d’Ouessant, Ile de Molène, Ile de Sein, Glénan Archipelago, Ile de Groix, Belle-Île, Ile de Houat, Ile d’Hoëdic, Ile-aux-Moines, Ile d’Arz, Ile d’Yeu and Ile d’Aix. In fact, the islands located off the west coast of France, in the Channel and the Atlantic, form a long archipelago which is referred to as the Iles du Ponant. This name is due to their geographic location, as the word ‘ponant’ means ‘where the sun sets’.

21/09/2017 - Learn more...
Finistère is the ‘most Breton’ of all the departments. Its name is derived from ‘Finis Terrae’, meaning the ends of the earth, as it is similarly called in Breton: "Penn ar Bed". It is however distinctly different from north to south and, apart from Corsica, it is the French department with the longest coastline. With the Channel to the north and the Atlantic to the west, the department boasts a number of prestigious and well-known natural sites, such as La Pointe du Raz, the Crozon Peninsula and Audierne Bay, to name but a few. And, of course, there are all the offshore islands, including Batz, the Molène archipelago, Ouessant, Sein, and the Glénan archipelago.

The French name Morbihan derives from the Breton for ‘the little sea’; thus this department in southern Brittany is named after the famous gulf which it encircles. It is a mysterious land, a paradise for migratory birds which stop off here, with its streams running through coastal heathland before disgorging into the wide ocean.

09/05/2017 - Learn more...
The northern coast of Brittany, bordering the Channel. The Côtes d’Armor department encompasses these areas of coastline: la Côte d’Emeraude (Emerald Coast), la Côte de Penthièvre, Saint Brieuc Bay, la Côte de Goëlo, la Côte de Granit Rose (Pink Granite Coast); also several woodland areas, known as ‘argoat’ in Breton, where Brittany’s rivers spring up: Trégor, Guerlédan, Central Brittany, and the Dinan area. There is a close rapport between the sea and the countryside here, with plenty of lovely walks, sporting opportunities and cultural trips to enjoy, and each area within the department offers a distinct landscape and identity.

In Ille et Vilaine there is, of course, Rennes, the capital of Brittany and the region’s frontier with the rest of France. But there is also Saint Malo, a picturesque city with a corsair history, set into the waters of the Channel. And, not far up the coast from there you will find Cancale with its famous oysters. At the other end of the department lies a land of legend, the Brocéliande Forest, home of the sorcerer Merlin in the story of King Arthur.

21/03/2017 - Learn more...
Quimperlé and the surrounding area is just bursting with natural, cultural and historical treasures for you to discover. Straddling land and sea, this part of Southern Finistère offers all sorts of activities for a great holiday amongst family or friends. Firstly, there are the rias, which are an emblematic feature of our region. At high tide, the sea washes up the rias and creates amazing landscapes where fauna and flora flourish of their own accord. With their quintessential Breton scenery betwixt land and sea, the Aven, Bélon and Laïta rias are ideal places for walking and various companies offer kayaking or boat trips. All along the coast, there are beaches and inlets where you can enjoy all that the seaside has to offer: supervised bathing, watersport activities, as well as less developed beaches. Tourists are delighted every year by the quality of our beaches, especially in environmental terms, and 5 beaches have been awarded the blue flag mark of distinction for clean waters. For those who like to get out on the water, between them the rias and the sea provide all sorts of nautical activities.

07/02/2017 - Learn more...
Maritime tradition has always been an important facet of Douarnenez’s history. Although only the fourth city of the Finistère ‘département’, Douarnenez can be regarded as a capital in terms of Breton heritage, thanks to its Port-Museum at Port-Rhu. Unique in France, the museum is part on land and part on water. Visitors can admire the boats anchored in the famous port, old sailing ships, boats used in the North Atlantic, all gathered together in the docks. Douarnenez can be rightly proud of its preeminent status in terms of maritime heritage. A town of contrast and colour, whose inhabitants reveal their character. A town whose history owes much to the humble sardine, enjoyed since Roman times, and the main catch in this area. A key fishing town, but especially known for conserving. Tucked away at the far side of the magnificent bay of Douarnenez, the town has retained its seafaring character, due in part to the large gatherings of old sailing ships taking place every four years.

26/04/2016 - Learn more...
Locronan lies between Quimper and Douarnenez in the far south west corner of Brittany, and has been awarded the prestigious title ‘one of the most beautiful villages in France’! Quintessentially Breton in its architecture, Locronan is also home to the most famous religious procession in Brittany, the ‘Troménie’. The oldest granite dwellings are gathered around a wide paved square, with a well as a pretty centrepiece, and the Renaissance buildings surrounding the square bear testament to the town’s prosperity in that era from weaving linen and making canvas for sails. The village has also been the backdrop to numerous movies...

03/11/2015 - Learn more...
Welcome to the land of the ‘Rias’, the coastline around Moëlan sur Mer, Clohars Carnoët and Riec sur Belon. Here, between land, sea and river, the south coast of Finistère has a well kept secret to reveal… A series of little ports nestle along this stretch of the coast and are a delight to explore, whether by road, by boat or on foot by way of the coastal paths. Doëlan, Brigneau, Le Pouldu, Merrien, Bélon and Rosbras; each of these ports have their own character for visitors to discover. Their unique landscapes, although immortalised by the painters of the Pont-Aven School, are constantly being redrawn with the ever-changing light and nuances of colour. Typical of Brittany, ‘rias’ are coastal river valleys which are invaded by seawater. These estuaries are known as ‘abers’ in northern Brittany, and ‘avens’ or ‘rias’ in southern Brittany.

28/03/2015 - Learn more...
Concarneau’s ‘ville close’, or walled town, encircled by ramparts and dominated by a belfry, is a defining feature of France’s third most important fishing port. Within its historic streets of granite houses, there is even a museum dedicated to fishing. Installed in the former dockyard, the museum’s varied collections show how fishing has been central throughout Concarneau’s history. The museum continues outside, with several vessels in the water, including a trawler. Take a stroll along the ramparts for a lovely view over the town and its ports – the leisure marina, the fishing harbour, and the commercial port – as well as the bustling quaysides all around. Not to be missed is the big ‘Filets Bleus’ (Blue Nets) festival in mid-August, a traditional Breton cultural spectacle. This fortified island known as the ‘ville close’ was originally home to a community of fishermen, who fished in the bay. Next a priory was established by the monks of Landévennec Abbey. The first fortifications around the little island, then known as Conq, appeared in the 13th century. But the major construction took place in the 15th century and the town started to be referred to as Conq-Kerne, meaning ‘Bay of Cornouaille’ in the Breton language, and it quickly became one of the very first citadels in Brittany, a ducal city then a royal one.

28/02/2015 - Learn more...
Wild coastlines and majestic beaches, punctuated by picturesque ports and seaside resorts make Brittany the preferred choice for many visitors to France. Brittany enjoys a mild climate and its Atlantic waters are pleasantly warmed by the Gulf Stream, and there are many beautiful beaches for bathing as well as various aquatic sports on offer. Inland, a variety of landscapes awaits exploration: valleys, forests, moors and a network of rivers and canals. There is the opportunity to try a huge range of activities in Brittany: beach volleyball, squash, windsurfing, fishing, golf, horse-riding and mountain biking to name but a few. There are also museums, galleries, zoos and aquariums to visit, as well as nature reserves and parks. Festivals and events, often centred around music and dancing, are held throughout the year.

14/10/2014 - Learn more...


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