(00 33) 2 98 39 62 25
Fax (by appointment) :
(00 33) 9 50 04 32 70
Contact Headquarters : 5 Hent Meneyer, 29 950 Gouesnac'h, France.
Postal address : 2 impasse de Kervégant, 29 350 Moëlan sur mer, France.
Despite the continual development of technologies – radio beacons, radar, GPS – it is still lighthouses that illuminate our coastline and are the last resort for sailors when their sophisticated equipment is faulty. Let’s shine a spotlight on these structures which have dotted the French coast since the end of the 18th century.

The history of lighthouses most probably began in Antiquity, in the Mediterranean. At first they were simple wood fires set alight on clifftops in the open air, then later atop towers specially built for the purpose, such as the famous lighthouse of Alexandria on the isle of Pharos. Lighthouses evolved along with their means of lighting: charcoal replaced wood, the oil lamp replaced charcoal, and electricity replaced the oil lamp.

24/08/2019 - Learn more...
A great activity to enjoy on holiday in Brittany, foraging for shellfish will delight young and old alike. It is a well-known pastime among Bretons, as our rich and varied coastline offers up numerous species of shellfish, notably molluscs and crustaceans, and at low tide people of all ages can be seen milling along the shoreline and over boulders, turning over rocks and stones, foraging in the seaweed, or digging in the wet sand in search of a tasty morsel… Talk to a born and bred Breton of ‘la pêche à pied’ and a hundred childhood memories will surface, remembering exciting moments of discovery from nature’s bounty and, even when the pickings were slim, never going home empty-handed. They will tell of the pleasure of learning the techniques and the best spots from their grandfather, as well as a strong respect for nature.

20/01/2019 - Learn more...
Of the 148 lighthouses along the French coastline, a third are in Brittany, which can be said to be quite logical in fact because Brittany represents a third of the country’s shoreline. Finistère alone contruibutes 23 of them, located either on the coast or at sea, including the most powerful one in the world, the highest in Europe and the oldest!

For a few years or decades now, there have been no lighthouse keepers, but these edifices dotted along the French coast since the end of the 18th century are still a night-time companion to sailors, and are there to safeguard the passage of all vessels at sea.

25/07/2018 - Learn more...
Imagine yourself Captain of a gigantic freighter, loaded with crude oil or with some other dangerous material on board, and so long and unwieldy that the power of the waves that night might snap it in two… engine failure, and there you are, castaway in the middle of the Iroise Sea, off the northwest coast of Brittany, one of the most dangerous places on the planet in terms of navigation… You’re going to sink, and trigger a major ecological disaster, broken in two by a swell over 15 metres high that night. Call for help: SOS!!!

Then, after an anxious wait, which may last a few hours or only 20 minutes, emerging from nowhere like a ghostly apparition and coming to your rescue is the powerful ocean-going tug, the Abeille-Bourbon…

15/04/2018 - Learn more...
The SNSM (standing for Société Nationale de Sauvetage en Mer) is the national lifeboat association in France. Very well known in Brittany in particular, out of all the regions of mainland France and its overseas territories, it is dedicated to saving lives at sea. A not-for-profit organisation created in 1967 by Admiral Maurice Amman, it has been recognised as a public service since 1970. Its mission is to rescue people in danger at sea, along the coastline and on beaches, voluntarily and at no charge. It is also given public service assignments as directed by regional lifeguard and lifesaving operational centres (abbreviated to CROSS in French). The organisation is mainly funded by public donations, and private partners, but around a quarter comes from the French state and local authorities. There are over 5,000 mobilisations in France each year, saving almost 10,000 people in difficulty, day and night.

25/10/2016 - Learn more...
Brittany is a maritime region whose climate is very influenced by its proximity to the North Atlantic Ocean and the Channel. But the effect of these two influences is different on the south coast compared to the north coast, and so the climate is not the same across the region, with temperatures in the south tending to be a few degrees higher than in the north. Brittany also has numerous microclimates, and it is common to experience several seasons in the same day; rain, sun, wind etc. As we say, here in Brittany, the weather turns out nice many times a day! With a temperate oceanic climate, this is the warmest part of France in winter, with snow and frost rare occurrences. And as temperatures in summer do not often rise above 25°C, the difference in temperature across the year is moderate. Then, in winter, the windy weather takes over, and we get the tail-end of cyclones originating at the Tropic of Cancer. Having crossed the Atlantic, they are dying out as they reach us, but they can still make for pretty violent storms here.

02/08/2016 - Learn more...


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