(00 33) 2 98 39 62 25
Contact Fax (by appointment) :
(00 33) 9 50 04 32 70
Headquarters : 5 Hent Meneyer, 29 950 Gouesnac'h, France.
Postal address : 2 impasse de Kervégant, 29 350 Moëlan sur mer, France.
Once you’ve arrived in Brittany, no doubt one of the first shops you will seek out is the bakery, ‘la boulangerie’. They are everywhere here, although there used to be more. Each village in the commune would have had their own bakery, so about 50 years ago there were no less than 17 in the commune of Moëlan sur Mer; nowadays I count five, three of which are in the town… and which are also patisseries, offering delicious cakes and pastries. Back in the day, many shops also operated as a ‘café’ alongside their principal activity, a practice which can still sometimes be seen today, so it is not uncommon in Brittany to come across a bistro which is also a hairdresser’s, a baker’s, a grocer’s, or a newsagent. This traditional style of village life does still endure in places, but of course is gradually disappearing. So, below are some of the tasty delights which you can find in ‘Les Gourmands Disent…’ and ‘La Boutique Gourmande’, the two boulangerie-pâtisseries on the square in Moëlan sur Mer, an area where many of our holiday rental properties are located.

03/08/2017 - Learn more...
Whilst holidaying in Brittany, you can’t miss visiting a crêperie – you can find one in most places. Crêpes, or ‘galettes’ as they are also known here, are almost as famous as pizzas or hamburgers and, because Bretons are great travellers, crêperies can now be found all around the world. There are two basic types of crêpe in terms of the flour used, either wheat flour for sweet crêpes or buckwheat flour for savoury crêpes. Both are usually accompanied by a bottle of cider, either ‘doux’ (the sweetest and lightest in terms of alcohol content), ‘sec’ or ‘brut’ (the driest and most alcoholic) or ‘demi-sec’ (in between). The cider is typically served in a bowl or wide cup, so you may hear people ask for “une bolée de cidre”. Or purists may order “un lait ribot”, a cup of buttermilk. Here is a homemade recipe, original in that it involves mixing the two different types of flour to create a crêpe which is equally good for sweet or savoury fillings.

21/06/2016 - Learn more...
The langoustine, or Nephrops norvegicus, is a decapod crustacean, the only species in the genus Nephrops. As in French, it is sometimes known as ‘langoustine’ in English, but it will be more familiar to many in Britain as ‘scampi’. Other names for it are Norway lobster or Dublin Bay prawn, and whilst it looks like a shrimp, it is officially in the lobster family. Langoustine are found in the north-eastern Atlantic, from Iceland to southern Portugal, and in the North Sea. They are also present in the Mediterranean, particularly in the western Med. Langoustine is very popular in Brittany, and found in every seafood restaurant. The ‘capital’ of langoustine fishing is the area of Loctudy and Le Guilvinec, two neighbouring ports in Bigouden country, in the far southwest of Brittany. You can’t stay in Finistère (western Brittany) without tasting it, either in a restaurant or at home; fried, poached, grilled, flambéed, roasted or simply cooked, with a good homemade mayonnaise. Here is my recipe…


20/12/2015 - Learn more...


pages : 1