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Fax (by appointment) :
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Contact Headquarters : 5 Hent Meneyer, 29 950 Gouesnac'h, France.
Postal address : 2 impasse de Kervégant, 29 350 Moëlan sur mer, France.
A great activity to enjoy on holiday in Brittany, foraging for shellfish will delight young and old alike. It is a well-known pastime among Bretons, as our rich and varied coastline offers up numerous species of shellfish, notably molluscs and crustaceans, and at low tide people of all ages can be seen milling along the shoreline and over boulders, turning over rocks and stones, foraging in the seaweed, or digging in the wet sand in search of a tasty morsel… Talk to a born and bred Breton of ‘la pêche à pied’ and a hundred childhood memories will surface, remembering exciting moments of discovery from nature’s bounty and, even when the pickings were slim, never going home empty-handed. They will tell of the pleasure of learning the techniques and the best spots from their grandfather, as well as a strong respect for nature.

20/01/2019 - Learn more...
If there is an archipelago in Brittany that can come close to its southern sea counterparts, it is the Glénan Archipelago, a scattering of nine large islands and numerous smaller siblings in the sea off Concarneau, its snow white sands lapped by clear turquoise waters. The Glénan Archipelago is composed of nine principal islands and a large number of smaller isles, but it is thought that way back this mass of granite had been a single land mass; indeed local legend even talks of how the nine Glénan isles were once one big island. They were eroded gradually by the waves over time but, if popular hearsay is anything to go by, collective memory of the time when this archipelago was part of the continent is not yet completely lost. It is said that it used to be possible to walk from Beg Meil (on the mainland) to the Ile aux Moutons, which is now far out at sea, and also that the Trévignon headland used to adjoin Cigogne island.

03/11/2018 - Learn more...
Brittany is a Celtic region… Yes, but what does that mean? The Celtic culture evokes for each of us numerous images, legends and sounds, but it becomes harder when we try to describe its real connections with Brittany more precisely. What is Celtic and what is Breton? Historical, geographical and cultural confusions abound and they have been further disseminated by popular culture, the prime example being the adventures of Asterix and his village of indomitable Gauls, set in what is now Brittany. In the story, menhirs and dolmens are part of everyday life and appear to be the sole preserve of the inhabitants of the Atlantic coast. But in reality, menhirs and dolmens have been found all over Europe and do not date from the Gallo-Roman era but rather from the Neolithic period, which was several millennia earlier.

15/09/2018 - Learn more...
Imagine yourself Captain of a gigantic freighter, loaded with crude oil or with some other dangerous material on board, and so long and unwieldy that the power of the waves that night might snap it in two… engine failure, and there you are, castaway in the middle of the Iroise Sea, off the northwest coast of Brittany, one of the most dangerous places on the planet in terms of navigation… You’re going to sink, and trigger a major ecological disaster, broken in two by a swell over 15 metres high that night. Call for help: SOS!!!

Then, after an anxious wait, which may last a few hours or only 20 minutes, emerging from nowhere like a ghostly apparition and coming to your rescue is the powerful ocean-going tug, the Abeille-Bourbon…

15/04/2018 - Learn more...
France is the second largest exporter of agri-food products in the world, after the US. And Brittany on its own could feed the whole of France. In 2017, 56% of the country’s pork was reared here, by around 3,500 Breton pig farmers, with an average of 200-300 sows each.
I would say this is almost certainly too much, as evidenced by the problematic proliferation of green algae, particularly on the north coast, in the Bay of Morlaix, the principal cause of which is animal effluent. This intensive breeding has direct and indirect consequences for the environment.
Pig farming in Brittany is well established… as related below by Jean Guillermou, who farmed pigs at Gouesnac’h from 1959, although he has been in retirement for many years now.

21/02/2018 - Learn more...
Classed as a ‘Biosphere Reserve’ by UNESCO, and part of the Armorique Regional Park, the island of Ouessant and the Molène Archipelago offer a striking vision of untamed beauty, and their powerful lighthouses watch over one of the busiest seafaring routes in the world, the Rail d’Ouessant. Molène has been inhabited since prehistoric times, and Ouessant is redolent of Ireland. These are among the Ponant Isles, alongside Groix and Belle-Ile in Morbihan, the Glénan Archipelago in southern Finistère, and many others, because this grouping brings together fifteen islands, all of which are have permanent inhabitants. Starting from the English Channel (from north to south) they are: Chausey Archipelago, Ile de Bréhat, Ile de Batz, Ile d’Ouessant, Ile de Molène, Ile de Sein, Glénan Archipelago, Ile de Groix, Belle-Île, Ile de Houat, Ile d’Hoëdic, Ile-aux-Moines, Ile d’Arz, Ile d’Yeu and Ile d’Aix. In fact, the islands located off the west coast of France, in the Channel and the Atlantic, form a long archipelago which is referred to as the Iles du Ponant. This name is due to their geographic location, as the word ‘ponant’ means ‘where the sun sets’.

21/09/2017 - Learn more...
Finistère is the ‘most Breton’ of all the departments. Its name is derived from ‘Finis Terrae’, meaning the ends of the earth, as it is similarly called in Breton: "Penn ar Bed". It is however distinctly different from north to south and, apart from Corsica, it is the French department with the longest coastline. With the Channel to the north and the Atlantic to the west, the department boasts a number of prestigious and well-known natural sites, such as La Pointe du Raz, the Crozon Peninsula and Audierne Bay, to name but a few. And, of course, there are all the offshore islands, including Batz, the Molène archipelago, Ouessant, Sein, and the Glénan archipelago.

The French name Morbihan derives from the Breton for ‘the little sea’; thus this department in southern Brittany is named after the famous gulf which it encircles. It is a mysterious land, a paradise for migratory birds which stop off here, with its streams running through coastal heathland before disgorging into the wide ocean.

09/05/2017 - Learn more...
The northern coast of Brittany, bordering the Channel. The Côtes d’Armor department encompasses these areas of coastline: la Côte d’Emeraude (Emerald Coast), la Côte de Penthièvre, Saint Brieuc Bay, la Côte de Goëlo, la Côte de Granit Rose (Pink Granite Coast); also several woodland areas, known as ‘argoat’ in Breton, where Brittany’s rivers spring up: Trégor, Guerlédan, Central Brittany, and the Dinan area. There is a close rapport between the sea and the countryside here, with plenty of lovely walks, sporting opportunities and cultural trips to enjoy, and each area within the department offers a distinct landscape and identity.

In Ille et Vilaine there is, of course, Rennes, the capital of Brittany and the region’s frontier with the rest of France. But there is also Saint Malo, a picturesque city with a corsair history, set into the waters of the Channel. And, not far up the coast from there you will find Cancale with its famous oysters. At the other end of the department lies a land of legend, the Brocéliande Forest, home of the sorcerer Merlin in the story of King Arthur.

21/03/2017 - Learn more...
Quimperlé and the surrounding area is just bursting with natural, cultural and historical treasures for you to discover. Straddling land and sea, this part of Southern Finistère offers all sorts of activities for a great holiday amongst family or friends. Firstly, there are the rias, which are an emblematic feature of our region. At high tide, the sea washes up the rias and creates amazing landscapes where fauna and flora flourish of their own accord. With their quintessential Breton scenery betwixt land and sea, the Aven, Bélon and Laïta rias are ideal places for walking and various companies offer kayaking or boat trips. All along the coast, there are beaches and inlets where you can enjoy all that the seaside has to offer: supervised bathing, watersport activities, as well as less developed beaches. Tourists are delighted every year by the quality of our beaches, especially in environmental terms, and 5 beaches have been awarded the blue flag mark of distinction for clean waters. For those who like to get out on the water, between them the rias and the sea provide all sorts of nautical activities.

07/02/2017 - Learn more...
The SNSM (standing for Société Nationale de Sauvetage en Mer) is the national lifeboat association in France. Very well known in Brittany in particular, out of all the regions of mainland France and its overseas territories, it is dedicated to saving lives at sea. A not-for-profit organisation created in 1967 by Admiral Maurice Amman, it has been recognised as a public service since 1970. Its mission is to rescue people in danger at sea, along the coastline and on beaches, voluntarily and at no charge. It is also given public service assignments as directed by regional lifeguard and lifesaving operational centres (abbreviated to CROSS in French). The organisation is mainly funded by public donations, and private partners, but around a quarter comes from the French state and local authorities. There are over 5,000 mobilisations in France each year, saving almost 10,000 people in difficulty, day and night.

25/10/2016 - Learn more...


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