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Contact Headquarters : 5 Hent Meneyer, 29 950 Gouesnac'h, France.
Postal address : 2 impasse de Kervégant, 29 350 Moëlan sur mer, France.
Brittany is a maritime region whose climate is very influenced by its proximity to the North Atlantic Ocean and the Channel. But the effect of these two influences is different on the south coast compared to the north coast, and so the climate is not the same across the region, with temperatures in the south tending to be a few degrees higher than in the north. Brittany also has numerous microclimates, and it is common to experience several seasons in the same day; rain, sun, wind etc. As we say, here in Brittany, the weather turns out nice many times a day! With a temperate oceanic climate, this is the warmest part of France in winter, with snow and frost rare occurrences. And as temperatures in summer do not often rise above 25°C, the difference in temperature across the year is moderate. Then, in winter, the windy weather takes over, and we get the tail-end of cyclones originating at the Tropic of Cancer. Having crossed the Atlantic, they are dying out as they reach us, but they can still make for pretty violent storms here.

02/10/2021 - Learn more...
Locronan lies between Quimper and Douarnenez in the far south west corner of Brittany, and has been awarded the prestigious title ‘one of the most beautiful villages in France’! Quintessentially Breton in its architecture, Locronan is also home to the most famous religious procession in Brittany, the ‘Troménie’. The oldest granite dwellings are gathered around a wide paved square, with a well as a pretty centrepiece, and the Renaissance buildings surrounding the square bear testament to the town’s prosperity in that era from weaving linen and making canvas for sails. The village has also been the backdrop to numerous movies...

08/09/2021 - Learn more...
A great activity to enjoy on holiday in Brittany, foraging for shellfish will delight young and old alike. It is a well-known pastime among Bretons, as our rich and varied coastline offers up numerous species of shellfish, notably molluscs and crustaceans, and at low tide people of all ages can be seen milling along the shoreline and over boulders, turning over rocks and stones, foraging in the seaweed, or digging in the wet sand in search of a tasty morsel… Talk to a born and bred Breton of ‘la pêche à pied’ and a hundred childhood memories will surface, remembering exciting moments of discovery from nature’s bounty and, even when the pickings were slim, never going home empty-handed. They will tell of the pleasure of learning the techniques and the best spots from their grandfather, as well as a strong respect for nature.

13/08/2021 - Learn more...
If there is an archipelago in Brittany that can come close to its southern sea counterparts, it is the Glénan Archipelago, a scattering of nine large islands and numerous smaller siblings in the sea off Concarneau, its snow white sands lapped by clear turquoise waters. The Glénan Archipelago is composed of nine principal islands and a large number of smaller isles, but it is thought that way back this mass of granite had been a single land mass; indeed local legend even talks of how the nine Glénan isles were once one big island. They were eroded gradually by the waves over time but, if popular hearsay is anything to go by, collective memory of the time when this archipelago was part of the continent is not yet completely lost. It is said that it used to be possible to walk from Beg Meil (on the mainland) to the Ile aux Moutons, which is now far out at sea, and also that the Trévignon headland used to adjoin Cigogne island.

25/07/2021 - Learn more...
As one of our closest neighbours, France’s history is often inextricably linked with Britain’s and it can be particularly fascinating to discover the connections across a shared timeline. As a neighbour, we may sometimes think we have a clear picture of what France is and has to offer… but like our own country, all the different regions have their own distinctive flavour: local customs, gastronomic specialities and diverse landscapes. With so much to offer, Brittany draws first-time visitors to experience its unique blend of culture, fun and relaxation, and once smitten they are sure to return again and again!

21/06/2021 - Learn more...
Despite the continual development of technologies – radio beacons, radar, GPS – it is still lighthouses that illuminate our coastline and are the last resort for sailors when their sophisticated equipment is faulty. Let’s shine a spotlight on these structures which have dotted the French coast since the end of the 18th century.

The history of lighthouses most probably began in Antiquity, in the Mediterranean. At first they were simple wood fires set alight on clifftops in the open air, then later atop towers specially built for the purpose, such as the famous lighthouse of Alexandria on the isle of Pharos. Lighthouses evolved along with their means of lighting: charcoal replaced wood, the oil lamp replaced charcoal, and electricity replaced the oil lamp.

09/04/2021 - Learn more...
Since the beginning of mankind, the sky has been the first tool used to gain knowledge, and Albert Einstein is said to have referred to astrology as the mother of science. Just as Chinese astrology can differ from ‘ours’ – that is, the astrology we are familiar with in Europe, with the 12 signs of the zodiac, which in fact comes from Egypt – Celtic astrology is also distinct. It starts from the idea that each person’s life broadly follows a sort of storyline which is set out in their solar birth story or ‘myth’, itself associated with one of the 36 constellations of Celtic astrology. Each of the 36 signs has a myth or legend, in which a person must become immersed in order to fulfil their destiny... Knowledge, thousands of years old, first birthed by the megalith makers and later taken up by Celts, exclusively passed on through word of mouth, by the Druids and the initiated few.

07/01/2021 - Learn more...
The SNSM (standing for Société Nationale de Sauvetage en Mer) is the national lifeboat association in France. Very well known in Brittany in particular, out of all the regions of mainland France and its overseas territories, it is dedicated to saving lives at sea. A not-for-profit organisation created in 1967 by Admiral Maurice Amman, it has been recognised as a public service since 1970. Its mission is to rescue people in danger at sea, along the coastline and on beaches, voluntarily and at no charge. It is also given public service assignments as directed by regional lifeguard and lifesaving operational centres (abbreviated to CROSS in French). The organisation is mainly funded by public donations, and private partners, but around a quarter comes from the French state and local authorities. There are over 5,000 mobilisations in France each year, saving almost 10,000 people in difficulty, day and night.

23/10/2020 - Learn more...
First prize for originality in the international competition for French-speaking writings about the travel and sea.

The head physician was an artist. The officer in charge of the crew was a “good fellow”, paternalistic and gruff, as is expected. And the petty officers were hard drinkers and didn’t try to hide it. And me, just a sailor. The “good fellow” called me “The Professor”. In civvy street, I was a painter and a drawing tutor. Clearly it was the title ‘Professor’ which most impressed the crew’s father figure. Not that this helped me in the least to get a rank, because after all what does one need with an artist on board a ship. But anyway, as I needed a speciality, I became a nurse. A sailor and a nurse – one could hardly dream of better at a time when France was defending its colonies in the Sahara or the Aures Mountains in Algeria. Naval forces were very rarely sent to these zones, apart from perhaps the odd marine commando, but to be one of these you have to be extremely sporty and not too “intellectual”. Sporty? Not me! Intellectual, I’m not sure, but probably not simple enough!

05/09/2020 - Learn more...
Of the 148 lighthouses along the French coastline, a third are in Brittany, which can be said to be quite logical in fact because Brittany represents a third of the country’s shoreline. Finistère alone contruibutes 23 of them, located either on the coast or at sea, including the most powerful one in the world, the highest in Europe and the oldest!

For a few years or decades now, there have been no lighthouse keepers, but these edifices dotted along the French coast since the end of the 18th century are still a night-time companion to sailors, and are there to safeguard the passage of all vessels at sea.

12/06/2020 - Learn more...


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