(00 33) 2 98 39 62 25
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(00 33) 9 50 04 32 70
Headquarters : 5 Hent Meneyer, 29 950 Gouesnac'h, France.
Postal address : 2 impasse de Kervégant, 29 350 Moëlan sur mer, France.
I grew up in Cornwall and whilst hordes of tourists descended on our region every summer our family would often drive down to Plymouth and get the ferry across to Roscoff in Brittany for our holidays. At first we stayed in the north, but over the years we explored quite a bit of the region. The beaches around Roscoff are gorgeous, a mix of amazingly fine white sand and rockpools to go foraging in. And Roscoff itself is more than just a ferry terminal. Venturing just to the east of Roscoff, we stayed near Perros-Guirec on the Pink Granite coast. The sandy beaches here are backed by distinctly rose-coloured rocky outcrops. We would often do a day trip to the huge Océanopolis aquarium in Brest, and further south, in the centre of Brittany, we’d go for long walks through some quite wild countryside. Then we finally got as far as the south coast… The area around Quimper and Pont-l’Abbé is quite traditional and strong in its Breton identity, and there are museums in this area dedicated to the local culture.

01/11/2017 - Learn more...
Classed as a ‘Biosphere Reserve’ by UNESCO, and part of the Armorique Regional Park, the island of Ouessant and the Molène Archipelago offer a striking vision of untamed beauty, and their powerful lighthouses watch over one of the busiest seafaring routes in the world, the Rail d’Ouessant. Molène has been inhabited since prehistoric times, and Ouessant is redolent of Ireland. These are among the Ponant Isles, alongside Groix and Belle-Ile in Morbihan, the Glénan Archipelago in southern Finistère, and many others, because this grouping brings together fifteen islands, all of which are have permanent inhabitants. Starting from the English Channel (from north to south) they are: Chausey Archipelago, Ile de Bréhat, Ile de Batz, Ile d’Ouessant, Ile de Molène, Ile de Sein, Glénan Archipelago, Ile de Groix, Belle-Île, Ile de Houat, Ile d’Hoëdic, Ile-aux-Moines, Ile d’Arz, Ile d’Yeu and Ile d’Aix. In fact, the islands located off the west coast of France, in the Channel and the Atlantic, form a long archipelago which is referred to as the Iles du Ponant. This name is due to their geographic location, as the word ‘ponant’ means ‘where the sun sets’.

21/09/2017 - Learn more...
Once you’ve arrived in Brittany, no doubt one of the first shops you will seek out is the bakery, ‘la boulangerie’. They are everywhere here, although there used to be more. Each village in the commune would have had their own bakery, so about 50 years ago there were no less than 17 in the commune of Moëlan sur Mer; nowadays I count five, three of which are in the town… and which are also patisseries, offering delicious cakes and pastries. Back in the day, many shops also operated as a ‘café’ alongside their principal activity, a practice which can still sometimes be seen today, so it is not uncommon in Brittany to come across a bistro which is also a hairdresser’s, a baker’s, a grocer’s, or a newsagent. This traditional style of village life does still endure in places, but of course is gradually disappearing. So, below are some of the tasty delights which you can find in ‘Les Gourmands Disent…’ and ‘La Boutique Gourmande’, the two boulangerie-pâtisseries on the square in Moëlan sur Mer, an area where many of our holiday rental properties are located.

03/08/2017 - Learn more...
Paul Gauguin was born in Paris on 7th June 1848, and died at Atuona in the Marquesas Islands on 8th May 1903. This famous painter was at first an Impressionist, but although coming from this movement he reacted against it by moving on in his work to use large uniform areas of colour and a more abstract drawing style. He was striving for a simplification of shape, eliminating details in order to retain only the essential form, a simplification achieved through the use of bold outlines and flat colour. His paintings abound in warm colours and soft shapes, placing the same importance on the natural element as on the figurative. He also wanted, as a symbolist, to confer a spiritual meaning onto his paintings. As his creativity began to burgeon, he spent some time in Brittany in 1886 with the young Emile Bernard, a cultured young man, only 18 years old, whereas Paul Gauguin was 38. It was at this time that, along with a few others, he founded what would later be known as the Pont-Aven School, and synthetism was born.

24/06/2017 - Learn more...
Finistère is the ‘most Breton’ of all the departments. Its name is derived from ‘Finis Terrae’, meaning the ends of the earth, as it is similarly called in Breton: "Penn ar Bed". It is however distinctly different from north to south and, apart from Corsica, it is the French department with the longest coastline. With the Channel to the north and the Atlantic to the west, the department boasts a number of prestigious and well-known natural sites, such as La Pointe du Raz, the Crozon Peninsula and Audierne Bay, to name but a few. And, of course, there are all the offshore islands, including Batz, the Molène archipelago, Ouessant, Sein, and the Glénan archipelago.

The French name Morbihan derives from the Breton for ‘the little sea’; thus this department in southern Brittany is named after the famous gulf which it encircles. It is a mysterious land, a paradise for migratory birds which stop off here, with its streams running through coastal heathland before disgorging into the wide ocean.

09/05/2017 - Learn more...
The northern coast of Brittany, bordering the Channel. The Côtes d’Armor department encompasses these areas of coastline: la Côte d’Emeraude (Emerald Coast), la Côte de Penthièvre, Saint Brieuc Bay, la Côte de Goëlo, la Côte de Granit Rose (Pink Granite Coast); also several woodland areas, known as ‘argoat’ in Breton, where Brittany’s rivers spring up: Trégor, Guerlédan, Central Brittany, and the Dinan area. There is a close rapport between the sea and the countryside here, with plenty of lovely walks, sporting opportunities and cultural trips to enjoy, and each area within the department offers a distinct landscape and identity.

In Ille et Vilaine there is, of course, Rennes, the capital of Brittany and the region’s frontier with the rest of France. But there is also Saint Malo, a picturesque city with a corsair history, set into the waters of the Channel. And, not far up the coast from there you will find Cancale with its famous oysters. At the other end of the department lies a land of legend, the Brocéliande Forest, home of the sorcerer Merlin in the story of King Arthur.

21/03/2017 - Learn more...
Quimperlé and the surrounding area is just bursting with natural, cultural and historical treasures for you to discover. Straddling land and sea, this part of Southern Finistère offers all sorts of activities for a great holiday amongst family or friends. Firstly, there are the rias, which are an emblematic feature of our region. At high tide, the sea washes up the rias and creates amazing landscapes where fauna and flora flourish of their own accord. With their quintessential Breton scenery betwixt land and sea, the Aven, Bélon and Laïta rias are ideal places for walking and various companies offer kayaking or boat trips. All along the coast, there are beaches and inlets where you can enjoy all that the seaside has to offer: supervised bathing, watersport activities, as well as less developed beaches. Tourists are delighted every year by the quality of our beaches, especially in environmental terms, and 5 beaches have been awarded the blue flag mark of distinction for clean waters. For those who like to get out on the water, between them the rias and the sea provide all sorts of nautical activities.

07/02/2017 - Learn more...
A French three-masted boat, built in the 19th century in 1896, it is the oldest in Europe, and classed as a historic monument. It took us back in time, and into a Breton storm… "Tonight the wind again blew hard on Brittany’s southern coastline. I was woken by the shutters banging against the walls of my studio on the second floor, so I went up to close them. When I opened the window, I breathed in a good lungful of the moist sea air as it whipped my face, the clouds raced by in the sky and I heard in the distance the lowing sound of the beacon commonly referred to as ‘the cow’, which sits at the entrance to Brigneau harbour. At that moment I felt a strong urge to find myself aboard the Bélem, where I had been two weeks before during stormy weather. The Bélem is a superb three-master, over 100 years old, a 19th century sailing ship which used to transport cocoa from Brazil. It was named after a town which sits at the mouth of the Amazon river, where it flows into the vast Atlantic Ocean. So, two weeks previously, I had been aboard this ship off the Breton coast heading for its home port, Nantes. We navigated day and night through spectacular weather, terrifying and sublime...

20/12/2016 - Learn more...
The SNSM (standing for Société Nationale de Sauvetage en Mer) is the national lifeboat association in France. Very well known in Brittany in particular, out of all the regions of mainland France and its overseas territories, it is dedicated to saving lives at sea. A not-for-profit organisation created in 1967 by Admiral Maurice Amman, it has been recognised as a public service since 1970. Its mission is to rescue people in danger at sea, along the coastline and on beaches, voluntarily and at no charge. It is also given public service assignments as directed by regional lifeguard and lifesaving operational centres (abbreviated to CROSS in French). The organisation is mainly funded by public donations, and private partners, but around a quarter comes from the French state and local authorities. There are over 5,000 mobilisations in France each year, saving almost 10,000 people in difficulty, day and night.

25/10/2016 - Learn more...
A megalith in the etymological sense is a large stone which has been set, on its own or with other stones, to create a manmade monument. There is nothing random about these monuments, they are positioned to face a certain direction, they use energy currents, and they are part of a larger whole on a regional, national or even continental scale. For example, if all the megaliths across Europe are seen as constellations, together they form a veritable star chart, a fact most non-initiates remain unaware of. Standing stones are found all over the world, and most were put in place between 5000 and 2000 BC, although in Western Europe their major development occurred in the third millennium BC. This was the Neolithic era, a prehistoric age when humans began to settle, construct villages, grow crops and raise animals. It was part of what we call the Stone Age, after which followed the Bronze Age and later still the Iron Age, which was the period when the Gauls arrived.

14/09/2016 - Learn more...


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